working out in the winter

Don’t Let Your Workout Routine End Because of Winter Weather

When the wind chill is in the negatives and your driveway is covered in snow it can be tempting to forgo your workout for the day. But no matter how the weather looks outside, you should always try to find 30 minutes a day to workout.

Why It’s Important to Workout in the Winter

That headline really should read, “Why it’s Important to Workout.” Proper exercise is so important for your physical and mental health year round. Between the “winter blues” (a.k.a seasonal affective disorder) and the celebratory eating that’s done around the holidays, not working out can have a serious negative effect on your overall health.

Staying Motivated in the Winter

Don’t let the shorter days fool you, there’s still plenty of time in the day to get a good workout in. If you’re struggling to find the will to workout, we’ve got some advice!

  • Recruit a workout buddy. Having a pal along for the ride (or run) can make your workout go by faster. A friend can also give you the motivation you need to get up and workout in the first place.
  • Understand when you workout best. Some people enjoy working out first thing in the morning while others prefer to exercise at night. When it comes down to it, neither is a better or healthier option. Is what you do that matter, not when you do it.
  • Workout inside when temperatures get low. Working out in cool weather is one thing, freezing weather is another. If you exercise outside when temperatures are very low, you run the risk of getting hypothermia, frostbite, and breathing complications.
  • Turn your lifestyle into a workout. If you really don’t have the time to exercise throughout the week, you can turn daily tasks into an exercise — take the stairs instead of the elevator, carry groceries instead of using a cart, and park far away from stores.

Debra Solomon, founder of Spectrum Strategies has many services waiting for you. From time management and productivity workshops to individual coaching, she is an expert in her field. Debra is focused on training young adults on the Autism Spectrum to accomplish life and career goals, no matter how big or small. Call (516) 510-7637 for your one on one.